Canadian Odyssey – Part Ten

View of the lake from our campsite — a sunbeam creeps across the treetops.

View of the lake from our campsite — it was cool watching sunbeams sweep across the treetops.

We estimated that our Head Lake campsite was eight stories above the lake. After much deliberation, procrastination, a few meals and a nap, we finally got out the GPS and measured the altitude. It was closer to four stories.

When you’re young, the world seems much larger. That’s because you’re so small. When you’re old, the world seems to get larger all over again. That’s because you’re so old.

We set up our hangout spot on high ground — with a panoramic view of the lake to one side and a view of a waterfalls on the other. It was a nice level spot with adequate trees to tie off our rain tarp. We’d need it. On one of the two days we stayed there, it rained continually until around 5:30 p.m.

I passed nearly four hours of that time rebooting my brain. I dove into my tent and took a three hour nap followed by meditation.

The view of the waterfalls from our campsite. So inviting!

The view of the waterfalls from our campsite. So inviting!

Our plein-air artists had followed us from Harness Lake to Head Lake and set up camp at the spot where we camped on our first night at Alqonquin Provincial Park. Actually, they would have beaten us to Head Lake if there weren’t so many of them. Yes, a bunch of 14-year-old girls kicked our asses; they handled the portage trail much better than we did. And with what appeared to be heavier packs.

We did our usual daytime exploring there, this time on Kenneth Lake. Steve said that sometimes canoeists like to work their way there and spend two or three days because it’s one of the more isolated lakes and not used as much as others.

I took advantage of the waterfalls between Kenneth and Head lakes, rinsing off several days worth of funk and luxuriating under the rushing water as it massaged my aching shoulder and back muscles.

This fungus was growing from a stump near my tent.

This fungus was growing from a stump near my tent.

On our final night there, we savored one last sunset together. In the morning, we’d take the mile-long portage back to Cache Lake. Steve and Ken would head back to the states and I’d begin the final leg of my Canadian Odyssey — visiting Pelee Island for the first time in my life.

While paddling to the portage to Kenneth Lake, we spotted this. The tree, when it was living, had grown around the boulder. Now they were going their separate ways.

While paddling to the portage to Kenneth Lake, we spotted this. The tree, when it was living, had grown around the boulder. They have since gone their separate ways.

Here's a view of Kenneth Lake from atop the waterfalls.

Here’s a view of Kenneth Lake from atop the waterfalls.

Mushroom cloud. I've often thought that, if I ever saw a real mushroom cloud from one of my campsites, I’d just keep on camping and canoeing. No point going back to a world that is no longer there. And doesn’t deserve to be.

Mushroom cloud. I’ve often thought that, if I ever saw a real mushroom cloud from one of my campsites, I’d just keep on camping and canoeing. No point going back to a world that’s no longer there. And doesn’t deserve to be.

Ken’s beside himself — or beside his namesake. I don’t suspect there’s much of a chance of finding an Irv Lake in Algonquin.

Ken’s beside himself — or beside his namesake. I don’t suspect there’s much of a chance of finding an Irv Lake in Algonquin.

A spatterdock bloom on Kenneth Lake. There were quite a few of them there ... and there would have been a lot more if the beavers hadn’t eaten them.

A spatterdock flower on Kenneth Lake. There were quite a few of them there. There would have been a lot more if the beavers hadn’t eaten them.

Steve and Ken take in the last sunset of our trip. It was a beauty — the sunset and the trip.

Steve and Ken take in the last sunset of our trip. It was a beauty — the sunset and the trip.

I get a shot of Steve getting a shot of the sunset ... If Ken had a camera, he could have gotten a shot of me getting a shot of Steve ...

I got a shot of Steve getting a shot of the sunset. If Ken had a camera, he could have gotten a shot of me getting a shot of Steve …

A loon photobombs my last sunset shot.

A loon photobombs my last sunset shot.

Next: On to Pelee Island

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